• Happy Beginning of the School Year from the Health Office!

    Posted by Meg Egan on 8/19/2019

    school children

    All medical forms are due now. New Pre-Kindergarteners, Kindergarteners, and new students need a recent physical and immunizations. Kindergartners need a professional eye and dental exam. All 2nd graders need a dental exam. If your child has a severe food allergy, asthma, diabetes, or a seizure disorder requiring medication, please fill out these forms as well with your child’s doctor. All medical forms can be downloaded from the Lincolnwood School District 74 webpage.

     

    Please remember to call the school every day your child will be absent from school.

     

    Let me know if you have any questions or concerns. Welcome back everybody!

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  • Medical Forms for Next School Year: Get Them Done During the Summer!

    Posted by Meg Egan on 5/22/2019

    sun

     

    Summer vacation is here! Remember to make an appointment with your child's doctor during the summer, so that all medical forms are ready before the start of the new school year. All forms are due on the first day. Students who need medical forms are: new Pre-Kindergarteners, Kindergarteners, and new students who will need a recent physical and immunizations. Kindergartners also need professional eye and dental exams. All 2nd graders need a dental exam. If your child has a severe food allergy, asthma, diabetes, or a seizure disorder requiring medication, please fill out these forms as well with your child’s doctor. All medical forms can be downloaded from the Lincolnwood School District 74 website. Thank you and enjoy your summer!

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  • Kindergarten and 2nd Grade Dental Forms are Due May 15th

    Posted by Meg Egan on 4/29/2019

    tooth

     

    The State of Illinois requires all Kindergarten and 2nd grade students to have a dental exam on file. These are due by May 15th for this year's K and 2nd grade students. If you have not already submitted a dental exam form this year, please download a copy of it here. The exam must not exceed 18 months from the May 15th date. If you have been to the dentist recently, ask him/her to fill out this form and turn it in to the Health Office. Thank you for keeping your children's teeth healthy!

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  • Is it a Cold or Seasonal Allergy?

    Posted by Meg Egan on 4/5/2019
    sneezing
     

    Symptom check: Is it a cold or allergy?

     

    Symptom

    Cold

    Allergy

    Cough

    Usually

    Sometimes

    General aches and pains

    Sometimes

    Never

    Fatigue and weakness

    Sometimes

    Sometimes

    Itchy eyes

    Rarely

    Usually

    Sneezing

    Usually

    Usually

    Sore throat

    Usually

    Rarely

    Runny nose

    Usually

    Usually

    Stuffy nose

    Usually

    Usually

    Fever

    Sometimes

    Never

     

    If you tend to get "colds" that develop suddenly and occur at the same time every year, it's possible that you actually have seasonal allergies. Although colds and seasonal allergies may share some of the same symptoms, they are very different diseases.

     

    Common colds are caused by viruses, while seasonal allergies are immune system responses triggered by exposure to allergens, such as seasonal tree or grass pollens.

     

    Treatment of a common cold may include rest, pain relievers and over-the-counter cold remedies, such as decongestants. A cold usually lasts three to 10 days, although some may last as long as two or three weeks.

     

    Treatment of seasonal allergies may include over-the-counter or prescription antihistamines, nasal steroid sprays and decongestants, and avoidance of exposure to allergens where possible. Seasonal allergies may last several weeks.

     

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  • Spring Allergy Season is Here!

    Posted by Meg Egan on 4/3/2019

     

    Image result for spring allergies

     

    Spring allergy season has started. Many people are suffering with runny noses, itchy throat and nose, red/itchy eyes, sneezing, and coughing. If your child has seasonal allergies, make sure to give him/her allergy medicine every day to help with the symptoms. If your child does not have a history of allergies but seems to have a cold that is lasting longer than 10 days, he/she might actually have seasonal allergies. For more information on seasonal allergies, check here and here.

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  • Is it the Cold or the Flu?

    Posted by Meg Egan on 1/25/2019

    sneeze

     

    It's that time of year again. Many cold viruses are causing sniffles, sneezing, and coughs in our little ones. How do you know if it's something worse; like the flu? Here's a good link to help you distinguish between the cold and flu.

     

    Here are helpful tips to keep you and your children safe from those nasty germs. Remind your children about these as well:

      

    • Hand washing is the #1 way to prevent the spread of germs.
    • Cough and sneeze into your elbow, or use a tissue, then wash your hands afterwards.
    • Wash hands with soap and warm water for a minimum of 15 -20 seconds. Sing your abc's or happy birthday to yourself!
    • Use hand sanitizer when soap and water are not available.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth without washing or using hand sanitizer first. Ask you child where the "T-Zone" is.
    • Take care of yourself (get enough rest, drink plenty of fluids, exercise, eat healthy foods, limit stress).
    • Stay home from school/work when you are sick.
    • Do not share food or drinks with others.
    • Get a Flu Shot.
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  • Nationwide Recall of Infants' Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension

    Posted by Meg Egan on 12/7/2018

    important

    A pharmaceutical company has recalled Infants' Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension. Please look through your medicine cabinets and check to make sure you don't have any of this product. Dispose of this medicine if you do. It may contain more ibuprofen than is recommended for infants. Check out the information here.

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  • U.S. Antibiotics Awareness Week

    Posted by Meg Egan on 11/8/2018

    Rx  

     

    Next week, November 12th through the 16th, is U.S. Antibiotics Awareness Week. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends using antibiotics only when needed for illnesses caused by bacteria, not viruses. They also recommend ways to use antibiotics appropriately, if prescribed, and how to keep ourselves well during this season of colds and flu. Here are their recommendations (taken from the CDC website in its enterity):

     

    • Antibiotics save lives. When a patient needs antibiotics, the benefits outweigh the risks of side effects and antibiotic resistance.
    • Antibiotics aren’t always the answer. Everyone can help improve antibiotic prescribing and use. Improving the way healthcare professionals prescribe antibiotics, and the way we take antibiotics, helps keep us healthy now, helps fight antibiotic resistance, and ensures that these lifesaving antibiotics will be available for future generations.
    • Antibiotics do not work on viruses, such as those that cause colds, flu, bronchitis, or runny noses, even if the mucus is thick, yellow, or green.
    • Antibiotics are only needed for treating infections caused by bacteria, but even some bacterial infections get better without antibiotics. Antibiotics aren’t needed for many sinus infections and some ear infections.
    • An antibiotic will not make you feel better if you have a virus. Respiratory viruses usually go away in a week or two without treatment. Ask your healthcare professional about the best way to feel better while your body fights off the virus.
    • When antibiotics aren’t needed, they won’t help you, and the side effects could still cause harm. Side effects range from minor to very severe health problems. When you need antibiotics for a bacterial infection, then the benefits usually outweigh the risk of side effects.
    • Taking antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria develop the ability to defeat the drugs designed to kill them.
    • If you need antibiotics, take them exactly as prescribed. Talk with your doctor if you have any questions about your antibiotics.
    • Talk with your doctor if you develop any side effects, especially severe diarrhea, since that could be a Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile or C. diff) infection, which needs to be treated.
    • Do your best to stay healthy and keep others healthy by cleaning hands, covering coughs, staying home when sick, and getting recommended vaccines, such as the flu vaccine.
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  • Pre-Kindergarten Hearing and Vision Screenings

    Posted by Meg Egan on 11/2/2018

    screen

     

    Vision and hearing screenings will take place for all Pre-Kindergarten students on November 6th-8th. Vision screening is mandated for these students.

     

    Vision screening is not a substitute for a complete eye and vision evaluation by an eye doctor. Your child is not required to undergo this vision screening if an optometrist or ophthalmologist has completed and signed a report form indicating that an eye examination has been administered within the previous 12 months. A copy of the eye examination needs to be on file in the school’s health office. 

     

    I will screen the students and, if necessary, do a second screening. If a student fails the screenings, a letter will be sent home requesting a doctor evaluation.
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  • Hearing and Vision Screenings

    Posted by Meg Egan on 10/16/2018

    students

     

    Vision and hearing screenings will take place for all Kindergarten through 2nd grade students on October 23rd through the 25th.

     

    Vision screening is mandated for the following students: Pre-Kindergarten, Second Grade, Transfer Students, Special Needs, and Teacher Referrals. Hearing screenings will also be done for Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade, Transfer Students, Special Needs, and Teacher Referrals.

     

    Vision screening is not a substitute for a complete eye and vision evaluation by an eye doctor. Your child is not required to undergo this vision screening if an optometrist or ophthalmologist has completed and signed a report form indicating that an eye examination has been administered within the previous 12 months. A copy of the eye examination needs to be on file in the school’s health office. All Kindergarten students are required to have a complete, professional eye examination. These forms were due October 15th. If you haven’t yet turned in your Kindergarten student’s eye exam form, please do so now.

     

    If a vision examination report is not on file in the health office, your child will be screened if he/she is required by the State of Illinois.

     

    I will screen the students and, if necessary, do a second screening. If a student fails the screenings, a letter will be sent home requesting a doctor evaluation.

     

    All Pre-Kindergarten students will be screened in November.

     

     

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